Charles Gutjahr

Melbourne, Australia

July 2019

Charles Gutjahr

A short opinion

Do you work at a company where your pay depends on a performance review?

I think it's logical to pay staff more if they're performing well. But do such companies pay for better performance or just for better performance reviews? The problem is performance reviews are subject to office politics, subtle biases and sometimes even overt discrimination. If there was an objective way to measure performance then it would be reasonable to pay more for better performance... but I reckon neither badly-aligned KPIs nor capricious performance reviews are good enough measures.

So I reckon we should forget about paying for performance. Focus performance reviews on helping people perform better rather than calculating pay rises. Take the money out of the equation and leave more space for honest feedback and personal growth!

Charles Gutjahr

Brunswick East, Victoria
The front garden gets its annual preparation

Charles Gutjahr

A short opinion

Robots taking all the jobs

It is possible that in the future robots take all our jobs... but I don't think we will lack for jobs in the future. The problem is we may lack for ways to pay for the jobs we need done.

We already need more aged care workers, more child care workers, more mental health workers; demographics suggest the need will only increase in future. We should not let robots and technology be a scapegoat for us failing to properly value and fund the services we need.

This article "A different dystopia: July 2030" speculates about an outcome that isn't the usual "robots took our jobs" story. I like its reminder that the choices we and our governments make do matter, and a robot dystopia is not inevitable.

Charles Gutjahr

A short opinion

Misinterpreting data

There are couple of times in my career as a programmer where I've made a bad decision because I misinterpreted data — analytics, user research, production data samples, etc. Sometimes the data was just plain wrong; sometimes the data was accurate enough but I drew the wrong conclusion from it. I'm surely not the only person to interpret data incorrectly but the topic seems to be rarely discussed in our industry.

That's why I like this article "The time I tried to ruin Halo 2". It is a good reminder to always think critically about the data in front of you.

Charles Gutjahr

Congratulations to Holly & Luke! I only just noticed the holly for Holly’s wedding...